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Sadie: a sweet and simple cabled sock. Free pattern! May 3, 2009

You know you’re an addicted knitter when…

…someone hands you a cute baby to hold and you just stare at the stitch pattern on her cute hand-knit hoodie.

The baby’s name is Sadie, the hoodie has now been outgrown, but the stitch pattern lives on, memorised, reconstructed, reinterpreted, and finally turned into socks.

These socks are constructed toe up, with a reversed heel-flap-and-gusset heel. A little simple calculation is required to work this heel, but it’s not scary, honest! Garter stitch inserts fill the centre of the cable twists, which are themselves framed by purl rounds. At the cuff, the cables merge smoothly into the unusual 7 stitch ribbing.

The pattern is written for 2 circular needles, but dpns or Magic Loop can easily be substituted if preferred. I have included a chart, as well as full written instructions for the stitch pattern.

Sadie Socks

Yarn: 90% fine alpaca, 10% cotton sock yarn (4 ply) from DT Craft and Design 100g (approx 350m).

(Or substitute any solid or semi-solid sock yarn of your choice, as long as gauge matches.)

This yarn is exceptionally soft, and requires some care to work with as it is quite loosely plied. But it easily repays the attention, forming a strong and supple fabric with a slight ‘halo’ and showing the stitch pattern beautifully.

Yarn dyed using Kool-Aid.

Needles: 2 x 2.5mm circular needles.

Gauge: 28 stitches x 20 rows = 10cm, over pattern using 2.5mm needles.

Finished Sizing: Fits a foot with diameter 23cm at widest part of the foot. Finished len

gth of foot is 23.5cm, length of leg is 22cm (measured in both cases from point of heel). For a wider foot or longer socks, you are likely to need a second skein of yarn.

Special Techniques: Figure of 8 cast on. Cabling without a cable needle (optional, but saves a whole lot of time) – I’ve attempted various methods, this tutorial looks like the simplest method over 2 stitches.

Abbreviations used in Pattern:

k = knit

p = purl

sl1 = slip next stitch purlwise

k1b = knit through the back of the loop

kfb = knit into front and back of the stitch

pfb = purl into front and back of the stitch

c2f = slip 1 stitch onto a cable needle held at the front of the work, knit next stitch from lef

t needle, knit stitch from the cable needle. (Or twist these 2 stitches as per the video tutorial linked above).

c2b = slip 1 stitch onto a cable needle held at the back of the work, knit next stitch from left needle, knit stitch from the cable needle. (Or twist these 2 stitches as per the video tutorial linked above).

w&t = wrap and turn. Slip next stitch purlwise, bring yarn between needles, slip stitch back so that the yarn has been wrapped around it. Turn work.

k2tog = knit next 2 stitches together

ssk = slip next 2 stitches separately knitwise, insert left needle tip into front of both stitches, and knit them together

p2tog = purl next 2 stitches together

Chart:

Sadie Stitch chart.

For foot, work stitch repeat 4 times, then the remaining 4 stitches. For leg, work stitch repeat 9 times, paying attention to the highlighted stitches on the first stitch of the relevant rounds. Chart created using Jacquie's Knitting Chart Maker (http://jacquie.typepad.com/Charts/knitChart.htm)

Sock ImagesPattern Stitch: (over 7 stitches and 20 rows). Final 4 stitches after the pattern repeat are for the foot only.

Row 1: [k1b, k2, k1b, k3], k1b, k2, k1b

Row 2: [k1b, p2, k1b, k3], k1b, p2, k1b

Rows 3-4: As rows 1-2

Row 5: [c2f, c2b, k3], c2f, c2b

Row 6: [p1, k2, p4], p1, k2, p1

Row 7: [k1, c2b, k4], k1, c2b, k1

Row 8: As row 6

Row 9: [c2b, c2f, k3], c2b, c2f

Row 10: As row 2

Rows 11-13: As rows 1-3

Row 14:  [k1b, p2, k1b, p3], k1b, p2, k1b

Rows 15-17: As rows 5-7

Row 18: k7

Rows 19-20: As rows 9-10.

Instructions:

Toe:

Using the figure of 8 method, cast on 8 stitches onto each of 2 circular needles (16 stitches). Knit 1 round on these stitches.

Increase Round: kfb, k till 2 stitches remain on Needle 1, kfb, k. Repeat on Needle 2. (20 stitches).

Work this round 3 more times (32 stitches).

Knit next round, then work Increase Round (36 stitches).

Work these 2 rounds 6 more times (60 stitches).

K next round, then work the Increase Round omitting one kfb on Needle 2. (63 stitches). You should have 32 stitches on Needle 1 (multiple of 7 + 4) and 31 stitches on Needle 2 (multiple of 7 + 3). K 1 round.

Foot:

Set up for foot pattern: Needle 1, [k1b, p2, k1b, k3] till 4 stitches remain on Needle 1, k1b, p2, k1b.

Work in stocking stitch over Needle 2 for whole of foot

Next round: start working foot pattern from chart, or follow written instructions for stitch pattern. Pattern repeats 4 times + 4 stitches over the top of the foot.

Continue as set until foot is 2 inches shorter than the desired length. (In my case, this was after 3 pattern repeats).

Gusset:

For the gusset, continue pattern over Needle 1, while increasing on alternate rounds on Needle 2 as follows: kfb, k until 2 stitches remain on Needle, kfb, k.  Continue until there are 47 stitches on Needle 2.

These stitches will be divided up as follows: 15 side stitches (Side 1), 17 cap stitches, 15 side stitches (Side 2).

If you are working the sole over a different number of stitches, see footnote for instructions on calculating the number of heel stitches you need.

Heel Cap:

K across the 15 stitches for Side 1. Slide these stitches onto Needle 1 or a piece of waste yarn while you work the heel cap. From the other end of Needle 2, slide the 15 stitches for Side 2 onto Needle 1 or a piece of waste yarn. Work heel cap over the remaining 17 central stitches only.

Row 1:  k, kfb, k until 2 stitches remain, w&t

Row 2: sl1, pfb, p until 2 stitches remain, w&t

Row 3: sl1, kfb, k until 3 stitches remain, w&t

Row 4: sl1, pfb, p until 3 stitches remain, w&t

Row5: sl1, kfb, k until 4 stitches remain, w&t

Row 6: sl1, pfb, p until 4 stitches remain, w&t

Continue as set, leaving 1 more stitch unworked at the end of the row each time, until the total number of stitches in the heel cap equals the orignal number of stitches in the sole of the foot – in this case, 31 stitches.

Next Row:  sl1, k across until 1 stitch remains on left needle, picking up wraps as you go – when you reach a wrapped stitch, slip it knitwise, then pick up the wrap with the point of the left needle. Slip the wrap knitwise, then insert the left needle point into the front of both the stitch and its wrap, and knit them together. Slide the 15 stitches for Side 2 back onto Needle 2 from the other needle or waste yarn. Ssk the last heel cap stitch and first side stitch. Turn work.

Next Row: sl1, p across until 1 stitch remains on left needle, picking up remaining wraps as you go – when you reach a wrapped stitch, slip it purlwise, then pick up the wrap with the point of the left needle. Slip the wrapped stitch back to the left needle, then p2tog with the stitch and its wrap. Slide the 15 stitches for Side 1 back onto Needle 2 from the other needle or waste yarn. P2tog the last heel cap stitch and first side stitch. Turn work.

Heel Flap:

Row 1: [sl1, k1] to last heel cap stitch, ssk with next side stitch, turn.

Row 2: p to last heel cap stitch, p2tog with next side stitch, turn.

Repeat these 2 rows until all side stitches have been incorporated into the heel flap. 31 stitches remain on Needle 2. Final Row: sl1, k across all remaining stitches on Needle 2.

Leg:

Work stitch pattern over all stitches on round until desired length is reached. (I did 3 pattern repeats here). If you are following the chart, take note of the highlighted stitches on rounds 6, 7, 8, 16, and 17. If you are not using the chart, you will need to do the following on these rows, at the beginning of the round only: rounds 6, 8 and 16: knit first stitch; rounds 7 and 17, purl first stitch. This will prevent a ‘jog’ at the start of the round.

Finish the leg pattern on round 3 or 13 of the pattern, to have a smooth transition to the ribbing on the cuff:

Cuff:

Ribbing pattern: [k1b, p2, k1b, p, k1b, p] repeat to end of round.

Work 15 rounds of ribbing, then cast off loosely in rib.

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*If you work this heel over a different number of stitches, here’s how to do the maths:

Firstly, decide how many rows you will want in your heel flap – 30 is a good number, but you may know that you need more. Also, calculate how many stitches you want for the cap of the heel as follows:

Take the number of sole stitches (before increasing) on Needle 2, and halve it.

  • If the total is an odd number and a half, add 1.5 to it. IE 31 sole stitches, halves to 15.5, + 1.5 = 17.
  • If the total is an even number and a half, add 2.5 to it. IE 33 sole stitches, halves to 16.5, +1.5 = 19.
  • If the total is an even number, add 2 to it. IE 32 sole stitches, halves to 16, + 2 = 18.
  • If the total is an odd number, add 3 to it. IE 30 sole stitches, halves to 15, +3 = 18.

The resulting number is how many stitches you will need to start the heel cap.

The total number of stitches you will need on Needle 2 after completing the gusset increases will be [heelflap stitches] + [heel cap stitches].

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Copyright Purplesteph 2009.

Please do: Use this pattern and tell other people about it.

Please don’t: Sell this pattern or completed items made using the pattern.

 

I am quite clearly a muppet

When in November it suddenly and inexplicably seemed like a good idea to attempt to make 2 scarves, 2 hats and a pair of socks in 5 weeks flat before Christmas, I knitted my dad some socks.  Now, Dad likes long socks, so to get the most sock possible from my random self-striping German sock yarn (not Regia but similar), I clearly had to go toe-up for the first time ever.  However, Dad also has the family high instep, which makes short-row heels just a bad idea if you ever want to actually get the sock on your foot.  So, me being me, I figured out a way to make a standard top-down heel-flap-and-gusset sock completely backwards.

And me being me being a complete and total muppet, I didn’t write it down before I gave the socks away.

Nowhere.  Nada.  Nix.

So when I tried to use the same method again for my Colinette Jitterbug socks, pain ensued.  With the frogging of the socks and the banging of the head on the coffee shop table.  That kind of pain.

But now, after many many attempts, I have not only reconstructed my original improvised method  for turning the heel, I have also written it down. Hurrah! And tested my own instructions by following them when I made the 2nd sock of the pair.  W00t.  Pass the cheesecake.  Etc.

The instructions now exist on the back of a scratty piece of paper.  Which due to inherent muppet-ness is likely to end up recycled once I finish the socks, with the instructions still on it.  So in the interests of forestalling future concussion, here it is, without (much) further ado:

Purplesteph’s Toe-Up Gusset & Heel-Flap Heel.

Catchy name.

Examples of this heel from l-r: Sadie, Nutbrown not-just-brown socks, Dad's socks. Further pictures & details of all 3 are on my Ravelry projects page.

Examples of this heel from l-r: Sadie, Nutbrown not-just-brown socks, Dad's socks. Further pictures & details of all 3 are on my Ravelry projects page.

These instructions assume that you are making a pair of toe-up socks using 2 circular needles – but the instructions are easily adaptable to dpns or Magic Loop.

Abbreviations:

k = knit; p = purl; sl = slip next stitch purlwise; w&t = wrap and turn (slip next stitch purlwise, bring yarn between needles, slip stitch back so that the yarn has been wrapped around it, then turn work); kfb = knit into front and back of stitch; pfb = purl into front and back of stitch; p2tog = purl next 2 stitches together; ssk = slip next 2 stitches separately knitwise, insert left needle tip into front of both stitches, and knit them together.

Gusset:

When you have knitted the foot of your sock to the desired length (approx. 2 inches less than the total length of your foot to the back of the heel), create a gusset on Needle 2 by increasing on alternate rounds as follows: kfb, k until 2 stitches remain on needle, kfb, k.  (K all Needle 2 stitches in the non-increase rounds. For Needle1, continue in sock pattern the whole of the gusset.)

To work out how many increase rounds you need to do, decide how many rows you will want in your heel flap – 30 is a good number, but you may know that you need more. Also, calculate how many stitches you want for the cap of the heel as follows:

Take the number of sole stitches (before increasing) on Needle 2, and halve it.

  • If the total is an odd number and a half, add 1.5 to it. IE 31 sole stitches, halves to 15.5, + 1.5 = 17.
  • If the total is an even number and a half, add 2.5 to it. IE 33 sole stitches, halves to 16.5, +1.5 = 19.
  • If the total is an even number, add 2 to it. IE 32 sole stitches, halves to 16, + 2 = 18.
  • If the total is an odd number, add 3 to it. IE 30 sole stitches, halves to 15, +3 = 18.

The resulting number is how many stitches you will need to start the heel cap.

The total number of stitches you will need on Needle 2 after completing the gusset increases will be [heelflap stitches] + [heel cap stitches].

Heel Cap:

K half the number of heelflap stitches (Side 1). Slide these stitches onto Needle 1 or a piece of waste yarn while you work the heel cap. From the other end of Needle 2, slide the remaining heelflap stitches (Side 2) onto Needle 1 or a piece of waste yarn. Work heel cap over the remaining central stitches only.

Row 1:  k, kfb, k until 2 stitches remain, w&t

Row 2: sl1, pfb, p until 2 stitches remain, w&t

Row 3: sl1, kfb, k until 3 stitches remain, w&t

Row 4: sl1, pfb, p until 3 stitches remain, w&t

Row5: sl1, kfb, k until 4 stitches remain, w&t

Row 6: sl1, pfb, p until 4 stitches remain, w&t

Continue as set, leaving 1 more stitch unworked at the end of the row each time, until the total number of stitches in the heel cap equals the orignal number of stitches in the sole of the foot.

Next Row:  sl1, k across until 1 stitch remains on left needle, picking up wraps as you go – when you reach a wrapped stitch, slip it knitwise, then pick up the wrap with the point of the left needle. Slip the wrap knitwise, then insert the left needle point into the front of both the stitch and its wrap, and knit them together. Slide the stitches for Side 2 back onto Needle 2 from the other needle or waste yarn. Ssk the last heel cap stitch and first side stitch. Turn work.

Next Row: sl1, p across until 1 stitch remains on left needle, picking up remaining wraps as you go – when you reach a wrapped stitch, slip it purlwise, then pick up the wrap with the point of the left needle. Slip the wrapped stitch back to the left needle, then p2tog with the stitch and its wrap. Slide the stitches for Side 1 back onto Needle 2 from the other needle or waste yarn. P2tog the last heel cap stitch and first side stitch. Turn work.

Heel Flap:

Row 1: [sl1, k1] to last heel cap stitch, ssk with next side stitch, turn.

Row 2: p to last heel cap stitch, p2tog with next side stitch, turn.

Repeat these 2 rows until all side stitches have been incorporated into the heel flap. You should have the same number of stitches on Needle 2 as you had on the sole of the sock, before working the gusset increases. Final Row: sl1, k across all remaining stitches on Needle 2.

Heel is now finished – Ta da!

 

This week I would like to thank April 6, 2009

Filed under: General yarniness,Sock obsession,Thoughts and Observations — purplesteph @ 12:42 pm
Signs of Spring

All photos taken by me, near my home - within 2 miles of the centre of Leeds. At least half of them are also within 10 feet of major roads. Also included: a shot of a local grass roof (big thanks to the homeowner for letting me inside for a better look); a bouquet my OH gave me on Friday; some local graffiti that caught my eye.

So, this week I would like to thank:

1. The people who planted the flowers

2. The One who makes them grow

3. Lynne and Hazel for being there while I was wrestling with an uncooperative heel on my latest socks (see future post for full gory details)

4. Helen from Ripples Hand Dyed Yarns for the gorgeous Iris yarn:

5. Everyone else on Ravelry who offered me suggestions in the Iris yarn thread.

(Memo: must get to Socktopus next time I’m in London).

6. Ooh – I almost forgot one! Thanks to Boots for bringing out the £1 ethical sock bag! They didn’t know that’s what they were doing, but what does that matter?

 

Spring is a state of mind March 15, 2009

Filed under: Dyeing,General yarniness,Sock obsession,Thoughts and Observations — purplesteph @ 4:09 pm

After spending this weekend at a conference centre (which had a swing! all conference centres should have swings!) I arrived home and found that my street looked unfamiliar.  The houses looked prettier, the gardens tidier; there were more green spaces than I remembered, and more trees.

I was pretty puzzled by this until the realisation hit me that I hadn’t walked down my street in that direction in daylight for ages, without carrying heavy shopping bags and being by definition intent on nothing else besides getting home to put them down.

For months I’d been leaving for work in a hurry without looking around me, and arriving back after dark.  At weekends I’d fallen into bad habits, hardly leaving the house at all except when I had somewhere else to be – and was usually again in a hurry.  It wasn’t the neighbourhood that had changed, it was me.

I never make New Year’s Resolutions, and suspect I’d have very little chance of keeping any that I did make.  The darkest and coldest time of the year always seems to me a depressing time to be making big changes.  Although it’s so long since I was in education myself, I’ve never managed to shake off the academic year, because I’ve always either worked at companies or volunteered with organisations connected to schools and education.  So sometimes I make September Resolutions, when the school year starts.  There’s an exciting bite to the breeze, the birds start massing to migrate, and there’s autumn to look forward to.

This time however I’ll be making some Spring Resolutions:

  • Get out more.
  • Look more closely at your local surroundings.
  • Take time to take time.

Every year the blossom catches me by surprise: This year I’m waiting for it.

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Quite early in the year I dyed some yarn an optimistic spring-y green – right before the week of the biggest snow that I’ve known in 12 years living in Yorkshire.  The yarn sat and looked at me – it practically laughed at me – as if reproaching me for misplaced optimism.   But I’ll have the last laugh when I knit with it.

Top: Alpaca/Nylon sock yarn, dyed with many many colours of Kool-Aid. Bottom: Alpaca/Nylon sock yarn, optimistically dyed a nice spring green with Lemon & Lime Kool-Aid.
Top: Alpaca/Nylon sock yarn, dyed with many many colours of Kool-Aid. Bottom: Alpaca/Nylon sock yarn, optimistically dyed a nice spring green with Lemon & Lime Kool-Aid.

And here are the results of my first ever foray into natural dyeing:

Top: Pure Wool DK dyed with used coffee grounds. Bottom: Pure Wool DK dyed with beetroot. These yarns will be a toy lion eventually.
Top: Pure Wool DK dyed with used coffee grounds. Bottom: Pure Wool DK dyed with beetroot. These yarns will be a toy lion eventually.
 

Fings wot I lerned this week February 21, 2009

Filed under: General yarniness,Sock obsession — purplesteph @ 8:10 am

1. Knitting in the round with a magic loop is all very well. Knitting cables without a cable needle is all very well. But trying to do both at once is a recipe for dropped stitches at the beginning of a loop section.  They fall right out of the sky. No, wait, that was something else.

2. (Following on from 1.). When you are trying to knit cables on a magic loop and have foolishly left your cable needle at home, the ink tube from a biro will just about do as a substitute.

–Both of the above discoveries made while attempting Fetching.

dsc02501

3. It is possible to do an invisible cast on for toe up socks with double pointed needles instead of 2 cable needles, it’s just a bit fiddly for the first few rows, and then you need to work backwards along the cast on row tightening the stitches.

— Discovered while attempting Ziggy.

dsc02505

And 1 thing I can’t do without this week or ever: Picasa photo editor tools, especially the Red-Eye remover.  It makes such a difference to photo my friends without glowing red evil eyes in every photo. Especially at weddings.

 

More socks February 10, 2009

Filed under: General yarniness,Sock obsession — purplesteph @ 5:16 pm

I said I’d made 10 pairs of socks. But actually I’ve realised it’s 11. Or maybe even 12. Is there no end to this madness?

 

Why I should never take up spinning… February 8, 2009

Filed under: General yarniness,Sock obsession — purplesteph @ 10:06 am

Someone once told me that knitting socks was addictive. Having just struggled through my first (and I swore last) pair of socks, I laughed it off. Then I thought: just one more pair can’t hurt.

Someone else told me that dyeing yarn was a fun and compulsive activity. I didn’t see the attraction. Then I thought: just a little bit of Kool-Aid, just to see what it’s all about.

Currently, I am knitting my 10th pair of socks and have at least as many pairs lined up to follow. My stash includes yarn for 23 pairs of socks (but some of it is going to be a blanket, honest!). I have also just bought more Kool-Aid and plenty of undyed yarn. And coffee grounds from Starbucks. Lots and lots of coffee grounds. And a book on dyeing. And a book on knitting socks with hand-painted yarn (to combine the 2 obsessions in the most natural way possible).

So I must never never never take up spinning. Or felting – no wait, I’ve already tried that one. If I ever spin, I will surely prick my finger on a spindle and sleep for a hundred years, I mean I will turn into a complete hermit and never be seen again.